Selling on Etsy, plus my current favorite photograph inspired by Jane Austen

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Jane Austen photo Dashwood Cottage by Diana Pappas

Do you shop on Etsy? I do, and everyday I am amazed by the truly fantastic creative works of art and design out there, no matter the medium. From illustrations to tote bags to pottery to knitwear to some seriously funky and fantastic vintage finds, there’s something for everyone on Etsy. I’ve been selling my photography there seriously for the last couple of years and I have to say it has been a slow process to get some sort of momentum in terms of sales.

Lately I’ve been taking on the challenge of how to make my photography more appealing to a buyer, how to help a buyer visualize what a print will be like when it is on actual fine art paper and not just a bunch of pixels on a screen. So today my husband and I went outside on this dreary overcast winter day and I posed him in front of our weathered garden fence (which is usually obscured by globe thistles, cosmos or monarda in the growing season – just typing this sentence is getting me incredibly excited for summer!) with a print. I should say that this is not just any print, this is one of my favorite photographs that I’ve ever taken, Dashwood Cottage.

I took this photograph in England a couple of years ago, on a blissful July day when all was seemingly right with the world and my life. Being there is a very peaceful memory for me. I call the photo Dashwood Cottage because I can just imagine Elinor and Marianne Dashwood (from Jane Austen’s Sense & Sensibility) to be at home. Above the weathered red door it says 1669, and I just love the trained yellow roses and the ladies mantle border that seems to tumble over under the weight of its chartreuse blooms. The photo is perpetual summer for me, just the thing I need to look at today!

Dune Bouquet: dried wildflowers on a dune in Northumberland

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Dried Bouquet by Diana Pappas

I’d like to share this bouquet of dried English wildflowers with you, captured on a dune along the North Sea in England. Even though the flowers were dried up and past their prime, I was drawn to the egg-yolk centers that remained. It’s a great color, isn’t it? Warm and golden, as if the flowers were still holding on to that summer sun. Does anyone out there know what kind of flowers these are? I’d love to know!

Winter Color – a blast of chartreuse and cinnamon

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Growth and Decay by Diana Pappas

Spring will soon invade with its beautiful pastels but I thought why not take a moment and indulge in some winter colors – or colours as they say in England! When I was in England for the holidays I fell in love with the wonderful winter colors around me, especially the cinnamon-colored dead bracken and fallen larch needles, and the glowing chartreuse of the ferns, mosses and grasses still hanging on despite the cold. It was a gorgeous landscape to get lost in!

In Growth and Decay, above, the colors combined beautifully, and I loved the touch of pale blue lichen on the stones and on the tree trunk to set it off. The growth of the tree and the decay of the dry stone wall was a perfect complement to the growth of the moss and ferns and the decay of the bracken. Growth and Decay is available on my Etsy shop, though here are a few more colorful favorites from the same day’s walk.

Bracken by Diana Pappas Larch needles on a track by Diana Pappas Bracken and spring by Diana Pappas

Windswept

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Windswept by Diana Pappas

After a couple of weeks of being sun-starved by cloudy and rainy December in England, we were treated to a spectacular sun-drenched walk on a beach in Northumberland on New Year’s Day. It can be quite cold and very windy as evidenced by this wind-sculpted tree, and this day was no exception. The wind tossed the dune grasses this way and that, and it made the loose sand on the beach take flight and form sand waves before our eyes. We tucked into natural windbreaks carved out by the dunes to be fortified by flasks of tea and coffee, and a Swedish rolled sandwich of meatballs and coleslaw. Some made sandcastles, others played hide-and-seek in the dunes, some took pictures, some walked the flat beach admiring the patterns in the sand – by the end of the day we were all exhausted by the blinding sun and constant wind, but we were energized and satisfied, and it was a great way to welcome a new year.

Prints of Windswept, above, are available in my Etsy shop.

Dunes by Diana Pappas

Sand Wind by Diana Pappas

Forest Sunset

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Forest Sunset by Diana Pappas

My husband grew up next to this forest in rural England – not a bad spot for an idyllic childhood! He’s a photographer too, and the forest no doubt informed and inspired some of his best works. Whenever I visit this magical place, it is transformed. It may be a different season or a different time of day, with different light or different weather, but there’s always something new to see, touch, smell, hear and even taste! Sometimes when I go through the forest I leave my camera behind. My motivations for doing so are usually for foraging purposes as I am busy scanning for blackberries, bilberries, nettles, ramps, or mushrooms, depending on the season. I was pleased, however to be lugging my camera with me on our Christmas walk in 2012, so I was prepared to capture the painted sky over the silhouetted forest that appeared toward the end of our walk.

Forest Sunset is available for sale in my Etsy shop.